Dear Nurses

Friday, September 28, 2007

CHEST PAIN SERIES FOR NURSES


Hi nurses,
First in the "Chest Pain Series" is finally here.
Also, please enjoy reading and learning about:http://www.dearnurses.net/the_clinical_setting_step_by_step
an ongoing collection of clinical scenarios designed to help nurses
improve their clinical skills and:
ENJOY!

RED ALERT FOR NURSES


UNDERSTANDING HYPOTHERMIA




Hi guys,

Hope you had a good week. I have tried to simplify Hypothermia for you.

Hypothermia regardless of the cause, is considered to be life-threatening. It is defined as a drop in core temperature of less than 95*F(35*C) and may result in death if left untreated.

Symptoms will depend on the degree of hypothermia. A patient may have shivering , cold bluish lips and extremities and slowly lapse into an unconscious state. Trauma and prolonged exposure to cold in the outdoors may lead to hypothermia. Small children and the elderly are also at risk. For more information on this topic, click on the link:
PACU CARE ( POSTOPERATIVE CARE).

ENJOY MY SIMPLE EXPLANATIONS.

UNDERSTANDING HYPOTHERMIA


A patient in the PACU( Post Anesthesia Care Unit (chapt 9) is at risk for hypothermia. Cold water immersion may also lead to hypothermia. Enjoy reading and learning.

HYPOTHERMIA


Hypothermia increases the body's demand for oxygen and if left untreated can lead to a myocardial infarction (heart attack).Cardiac arrhythmias and alcohol ingestion may also lead to hypothermia. For more helpful information on this topic, click on the link:
PACU CARE ( POSTOPERATIVE CARE).

HYPOTHERMIA TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

Avoiding hypothermia is the key. Hypothermia can be prevented by understanding the causes and preventing the occasion. THINK AHEAD if going hiking , skiing or other outdoor activities. Carry enough warm clothing and fluids. Keep small children well hydrated and avoid prolonged overexposure of small children to cold weather.
Learn more about Hypothermia in the Clinical Setting (PACU CARE, chapter 9).
HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

Friday, September 21, 2007

CARDIOGENIC SHOCK ( CASE STUDY )


Hi guys,

Hope you had a good week. I have tried to simplify Cardiogenic Shock
in a case study format. Just click on the link:
or you may prefer to watch the video:
(Sessions 10)
Also enjoy learning more about Hypovolemic shock by clicking on the link:

CARDIOGENIC SHOCK ( CASE STUDY)

Enjoy reading the complete Cardiogenic Shock Case Study,
simply click on the link:
http://www.dearnurses.com/cardiogenic_shock_-_a_case_study
Also enjoy learning about how to recognize the patient in Hypovolemic shock.
Simply click on the link:
http://www.dearnurses.net/the_clinical_setting_step_by_step
(Chapters 1 and 14)
Do you know your heart




CARDIOGENIC SHOCK (CLINICAL PICTURE)

To learn more about the patient in Cardiogenic Shock (Sessions 10)
or simply click on the link:
http://www.dearnurses.com/cardiogenic_shock_-_a_case_study
Enjoy reading and learning more.

CARDIOGENIC SHOCK ( MANAGEMENT)


The Management of the patient in Cardiogenic Shock (Sessions 10)
can be easy, if you understand the complete picture.
To learn more, simply click on the link:
Enjoy learning.

CARDIOGENIC SHOCK, SIMPLIFIED



Understanding what happens to the patient in Cardiogenic Shock (Sessions 10)
can make management easier.
To learn more, simply click on the link:
http://www.dearnurses.com/cardiogenic_shock_-_a_case_study
Enjoy learning.


HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

Friday, September 14, 2007

HYPOVOLEMIC SHOCK


Hi guys,

Hope you had a good week. I have tried to simplify Hypovolemic Shock (Sessios 9)
Just click on the link:
(Chapter 1, 7 and 14).
Enjoy learning!

HYPOVOLEMIC SHOCK


Hypovolemic Shock (Sessions 9) results from excessive fluid loss and inadequate
fluid volume.
Just click on the link:
Enjoy learning.

HYPOVOLEMIC SHOCK


The patient in Hypovolemic Shock (Sessions 9) may display the above clinical picture.
Just click on the link:
Enjoy learning.

HYPOVOLEMIC SHOCK


Hypovolemic shock (Sessions 9) is a life-threatening emergency. Trauma patients
commonly experience Hypovolemic Shock. Quick management and replacement of
the fluid loss brings about good results. Fluid replacement either with blood and blood
products or IV fluids will depend on the amount of fluid lost and the trauma team's decision.
Just click on the link:
( Chapters 1, 7, 14)
Enjoy learning.

Sunday, September 09, 2007

CHEST PAIN MANAGEMENT


Hi nurses,


How good are your clinical skills? Do you know how to manage a patient complaining of chest pain, a diabetic patient or a stroke patient ? Stay posted!COMING SOON A SERIES THAT WILL ADDRESS YOUR CONCERNS.
UPDATE: Learn more about the patient with chest pain, diabetes or stroke symptoms.
Simply click on the link:http://www.dearnurses.com/ and enjoy learning.

Saturday, September 08, 2007

SPINAL SHOCK (CASE STUDY)

Injury to the spinal column may not be easy to diagnose at the scene of the accident. The spinal column has a high network of nerves which control blood pressure. Injury to the spinal cord will result in blood flow being affected and ultimately a change in blood pressure. IV Fluid
replacement therapy and drugs such as Dopamine may be necessary to correct hypotension.
*Steroids in an IV solution may be given in a drip form, to decrease swelling around the spinal cord and reduce futher damage. Enjoy learning more about Traumatic Injuries.
* (Chapter 9 Pharmacology for Nurses)

SPINAL SHOCK


Spinal Shock continues below. Enjoy learning.

SPINAL SHOCK




Injury to the spinal cord following trauma may result in shock
For more helpful information visit The New Nurse 
Spinal Shock . Enjoy learning.

SPINAL SHOCK (WHAT IS IT )


Hi guys,

Hope you had a good week. I have tried to simplify Spinal Shock (Sessions 8 and 9).
This is seen in patients who have sustained spinal injuries.
For more helpful information on Spinal Shock and other traumatic events, simply
and enjoy learning.
Have a good week.